?

Log in

No account? Create an account
Religious Pluralism - Mo's Journal
September 14th, 2011
10:58 am

[Link]

Previous Entry Share Next Entry
Religious Pluralism
I came across this argument for religious pluralism in a book I was (re)reading en route to work:

"Spiritual wants and instincts are as various in the human family as are physical appetites, complexions, and features, and a man is only at his best, morally, when he is equipped with the religious garment whose color and shape and size most nicely accomodate themselves to the spiritual complexion, angularities, and stature of the individual who wears it."

Anybody recognize it? Or want to guess who wrote it?

(12 comments | Leave a comment)

Comments
 
[User Picture]
From:talktooloose
Date:September 14th, 2011 05:20 pm (UTC)
(Link)
I don't know, but the world is always stronger in diversity than monoculture (a sentiment I will feel even more strongly after a day at the Vatican tomorrow).
[User Picture]
From:mofic
Date:September 14th, 2011 07:15 pm (UTC)
(Link)
Let me know how it goes at the Vatican!
[User Picture]
From:chyldofeternity
Date:September 14th, 2011 05:47 pm (UTC)
(Link)
Mark Twain - A yankee in King Arthur's Court. Right?? At least I think it was Mark Twain. he as a lot of quotes I like.
[User Picture]
From:mofic
Date:September 14th, 2011 07:17 pm (UTC)
(Link)
Ding ding ding! We have a winner. A Connecticut Yankee in King Arthur's Court, which is available on Google Books, so I've been reading it on my phone.

I find most of the pithy Twain quotes and aphorisms are from Puddnhead Wilson, which I re-read a couple of years ago. But this one really struck me.
From:(Anonymous)
Date:September 14th, 2011 06:34 pm (UTC)
(Link)
No guess, but I love it. Rabbi Brusso used to say "There is more than one way up the mountain." Simple but true.
[User Picture]
From:mofic
Date:September 14th, 2011 07:18 pm (UTC)
(Link)
That's got to be my sister Sharon, not logged in. Yeah, I love it, too.

It's from Twain's A Connecticut Yankee in King Arthur's Court which is proving to be as much fun as the first time I read it.
[User Picture]
From:stirsmn
Date:September 15th, 2011 01:30 am (UTC)
(Link)
Yeah, that was me. I realized afterwards that I wasn't logged in. I guess if I were trying to be stealthy I wouldn't have mentioned Rabbi Brusso by name.
[User Picture]
From:kestrelsparhawk
Date:September 14th, 2011 07:45 pm (UTC)
(Link)
My guess was "Mark Twain," but I had no idea of the novel it might be in.

Never read Puddnhead Willson... sounds like I need to.
[User Picture]
From:mofic
Date:September 14th, 2011 08:06 pm (UTC)
(Link)
I think Puddnhead Wilson is the least popular of his books, presumably because the subject matter makes people uncomfortable, but I really like it. It was his second novel featuring two similar looking boys who switch places, the first of course being The Prince and the Pauper. But in Puddnhead Wilson the story occurs in the recent past (Twain's recent past) and in an American setting. The two boys are a slave and slaveowner and they are also half-brothers and the slave mother of one of them is the half-sister to the other's mother. So he gives them a good reason for looking like each other (and unlike his first attempt they aren't truly identical - they are switched as infants). So he takes the same basic idea but instead of a kind of magical doppelganger story it's a very real one.

Anyway, Puddnhead Wilson of the title is a lawyer who figures out the whole thing. And he has put together a calendar that's kind of a curmudgeon's version of Poor Richard's Almanac, with cynical aphorisms in it that start each chapter. That's where most of the pithy Twain quotes we know come from.
[User Picture]
From:kestrelsparhawk
Date:September 17th, 2011 01:34 am (UTC)
(Link)
Wow, it sounds like a lot of fun. Thanks -- obviously, I have to track it down now. It also sounds quite brilliant, and definitely not a "classic" as far as most school boards would be concerned.

How's your healing going? You had quite the week.
[User Picture]
From:talktooloose
Date:September 15th, 2011 04:57 pm (UTC)
(Link)
Ha! I just came upon a Twain quote I didn't like this week (though it amused me). We saw Titian’s Venus of Urbano in Florence last week and were very taken by it. Twain wasn’t. Read his reaction and see the painting here.

At the risk of too modern an interpretation, the paintin seems to be wise about female sexuality, and the Venus seems toown hers fullly. I'm intrigued by the (young?) woman in the back digging further into the chest of sexual mystery, watched by an older woman.

All too much for poor Mr. Twain. Woman are supposed to modestly cover the pudenda, not actually TOUCH it!
[User Picture]
From:mofic
Date:September 16th, 2011 11:52 am (UTC)
(Link)
It is a funny quote, and kind of a funny comment on the difference between Nineteenth Century American values and Italian renaissance values.
Mofic Powered by LiveJournal.com