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What Does It Mean to Say that Slash is (or isn't) Subversive? - Mo's Journal — LiveJournal
January 22nd, 2007
05:12 pm

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What Does It Mean to Say that Slash is (or isn't) Subversive?

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From:mofic
Date:January 23rd, 2007 07:51 pm (UTC)
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Yes, that's a good point. Slash can be more subversive of authorial intent than other fanfic and it also can be subversive within fandom (although I think that's much less true now than it was a 5-10 years ago).
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From:hitchhiker
Date:January 23rd, 2007 08:02 pm (UTC)
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Actually, I was thinking of it as subversive when viewed in the context of culture-as-a-whole. The thing is, fanfic per se I don't see as subversive, but merely an extension of "can Batman beat up Spiderman?" arguments and Prince Charming fantasies. In fact, more than simply being non-subversive, it is actually a going-along-with and a refinement of the way people interact with fiction.

Slashfic, on the other hand, is the first common genre to rip characters out of their milieu and thrust them into an explicitly shocking scenario - it is not a question of subverting authorial intent, but rather of subverting implicit but ubiquitous assumptions about the ways in which fictional characters are married to our productive/communicative imagination. If I had to sum it up in a single word, I'd say slashfic subverted fanfic.
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From:mofic
Date:January 23rd, 2007 08:22 pm (UTC)
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That's an interesting - and kind of novel to me - view. I'm so accustomed to folks thinking of fanfic as an inherently subversive way to interact with fiction. OT1H, I say (and believe) that it's the adult equivalent of my dominant form of play as a child and my children's dominant form of play ("Let's pretend that you're Scott and I'm Logan and we have an adventure together!") OTOH, there is something challenging to societal norms about that kind of childish activity translated into an adult pastime.

I really like this bit: Slashfic, on the other hand, is the first common genre to rip characters out of their milieu and thrust them into an explicitly shocking scenario - it is not a question of subverting authorial intent, but rather of subverting implicit but ubiquitous assumptions about the ways in which fictional characters are married to our productive/communicative imagination. If I had to sum it up in a single word, I'd say slashfic subverted fanfic.

I don't know if that's what I'm doing :-) but I like it.
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